Addressing LGBT2SQ+ Youth Dating and Relationship Violence in Schools

Research suggests that LGBT2SQ+ youth experience dating and relationship violence at significantly higher rates than heterosexual youth. Experiencing dating and relationship violence as a youth can lead to life-long impacts. Learning how to address and respond to instances of dating and relationship violence within schools can help decrease the negative impacts of this trauma on the survivor. Despite increasing queer and trans visibility, these communities continue to experience significant barriers to inclusive counselling and care. These barriers include limited understanding of the specific needs and considerations of LGBT2SQ+ youth survivors of dating and relationship violence, stigma and discrimination within a heterosexist and cissexist society, and service provider’s reluctance or fear around serving these communities. This workshop will draw on terminology, theory, best practices, and the presenter’s own counselling experience with queer and trans clients to provide participants with some essential knowledge and skills that will increase inclusion in their practice and enhance their capacity to meet the needs of LGBT2SQ+ youth survivors of dating and relationship violence.   

The Safe Choices LGBT2SQ+ Support and Education Program is a program of EVA BC, funded by Vancouver Coastal Health. The program focuses on preventing violence in LGBT2SQ+ people’s intimate relationships. We offer Service Provider Education Workshops and Healthy Relationship Workshops for the LGBT2SQ+ community within the Vancouver Coastal Health region. Using our existing curriculum, we hope to tailor our service provider workshop to meet the needs of participants at the 2020 BCSCA Provincial Conference.

Target Audience

Secondary

Sessions

A1 Friday 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Secure your spot now.

 Add To My Workshops

Presenter

  • Ending Violence Association of BC (EVA BC)
    Olivia Fischer

    Olivia Fischer, MA in Counselling Psychology, is a queer, non-binary settler who lives, studies, and plays on the unceded land of the Coast Salish people. Presently working on her PhD in Counselling Psychology at UBC, she is passionate about providing a non-judgmental atmosphere that fosters self-awareness for her clients. Her area of specialization is in LGBT2SQ+ populations, having published in the areas of non-binary and transmasculine reproduction, LGBT2SQ+ domestic homicide, and the partners of trans people’s experiences of sexuality. For four years, she has worked for the Ending Violence Association of BC, coordinating and facilitating workshops on preventing and responding to intimate partner violence in queer and trans communities. Actively engaged in this work, she is committed to elevating the voices of marginalized people and resisting negative heteronormative, transphobic beliefs and messages that are prevalent within our culture.